Tag Archives: interpretation

Translation and Interpretation #3

My devout reader João asked me the other day to write something about the different types of interpretation I do. That was actually a great idea, seeing that people who don’t actively work in this area (namely translators and interpreters themselves, as well as the agencies who hire their services) don’t usually know the difference among the several types of interpretation. This is the third post of a series, come back soon for the others!

After having clarified the difference between translation and interpretation, and having discussed simultaneous interpretation, let’s take a look at consecutive interpretation, another important variety of interpretation.

The typical environment for a consecutive interpretation would be a fairly small meeting or presentation (small meaning with a small number of participants and a short time), in which most of the people speak one language, but the people who are going to do most of the talking speak a different one. This usually applies to negotiations, meetings, guided visits, etc when there are more than four or five foreigners.

Another situation in which consecutive interpretation is used is when, despite the large proportions of an event, its organizers could not afford to hire simultaneous interpretation.  That’s not ideal, you’ll see why.

Unlike simultaneous interpretation, this variety demands no special equipment: all the interpreters need is themselves, pen and paper. Sometimes, a sound system is used so that the interpreters don’t have to yell.

Ideally, the interpreter will have time to talk to all the speakers before the event starts so that they can establish some ground rules in order to assure that things will go on smoothly. These rules generally define how long the speakers may speak before the interpreter starts delivering their version of that portion of speech. This time varies, reaching up to 20 minutes. There should be a balance between the time allotted to the speakers and that allotted to the interpreter, otherwise people may lose interest in the topic or have difficulties following the speakers’ line of thought.

While the speakers are talking, the interpreter takes notes of what they are saying so that they can later give a faithful rendition of what was said, although not with the same words. This kind of interpretation requires total concentration from the interpreter, besides excellent note-taking skills and an ability to summarize information without leaving anything important out.

It is clear to see that consecutive interpretation is quite demanding and tiring and there’s an added complication to take into account: the interpreter will be in plain view of the audience while working. It may sound silly, but this is a stress factor for us! We’re used to being in the safety of our soundproofed booths; it’s not that easy to concentrate when you have several sound and visual stimuli coming from the audience and the environment itself. But we get by…

Well, the last type of interpretation we’re going to discuss is whispered interpretation. Would you venture to guess? Find out on the next and final post of the series!

==================================================================

Meu dedicado leitor João outro dia pediu que eu escrevesse algo sobre os diferentes tipos de interpretação que eu realizo. Essa foi mesmo uma ótima ideia, já que as pessoas que não trabalham ativamente nessa área (tradutores e intérpretes, assim como as agências que os contratam) normalmente não sabem a diferença entre os diversos tipos de interpretação. Este é o terceiro post de uma série, volte em breve para ver os outros!

Após termos esclarecido a diferença entre tradução e interpretação,  e termos falado sobre interpretação simultânea, vamos abordar a interpretação consecutiva, outra importante variante da interpretação.

O ambiente típico de uma interpretação consecutiva seria uma reunião ou apresentação relativamente pequena (pequena no sentido de poucos participantes e de curta duração), na qual a maioria das pessoas fala um idioma, mas as pessoas que vão ter que se pronunciar mais falam um idioma diferente. Isso normalmente se aplica a negociações, reuniões, visitas guiadas, etc, quando há mais de quatro ou cinco estrangeiros.

Outra situação na qual a interpretação consecutiva é utilizada é quando, apesar das grandes proporções de um evento, seus organizadores não puderam arcar com o custo de contratação da interpretação simultânea. Não é o ideal, você verá por que.

Ao contrario da interpretação simultânea, esta variante não exige nenhum equipamento especial: tudo o que os intérpretes precisam é eles mesmos, papel e caneta. Às vezes, um sistema de som é utilizado para que os intérpretes não precisem gritar.

O ideal é que o intérprete tenha tempo de falar com todas as pessoas que vão se pronunciar com mais freqüência antes do início do evento, para estabelecer com eles algumas regras básicas e garantir assim um evento tranqüilo. Essas regras geralmente definem o quanto os participantes devem falar antes de o intérprete começar a transmitir sua versão daquele trecho. Esse tempo varia, podendo chegar a 20 minutos. Deve haver um equilíbrio entre o tempo destinado aos participantes e o tempo destinado ao intérprete, para que os outros participantes não percam o interesse no tema, ou tenha dificuldades para seguir a linha de raciocínio de quem está falando.

Enquanto os participantes estão se pronunciando, o intérprete toma notas do que eles estão dizendo para poder mais tarde apresentar uma versão fiel do que foi dito, embora não com as mesmas palavras. Este tipo de interpretação exige total concentração do intérprete, além de uma excelente habilidade de tomar notas e a capacidade de resumir a informação sem deixar de fora nada importante.

É fácil ver que a interpretação consecutiva é bastante exigente e cansativa, e há um agravante a ser considerado: o intérprete estará à vista de todos enquanto trabalha. Pode parecer bobagem, mas esse é um fator de stress para nós! Estamos acostumados a ficar na segurança de nossas cabines à prova de som, não é fácil manter a concentração quando há vários estímulos auditivos e visuais vindo do público e do próprio ambiente. Mas a gente se vira…

Bem, o último tipo de interpretação que vamos discutir será a interpretação sussurrada. Quer arriscar um palpite? Descubra no próximo e último post desta série!

Advertisements

4 Comments

Filed under about the blog, Translation and Interpretation

Translation and Interpretation #2

My devout reader João asked me the other day to write something about the different types of interpretation I do. That was actually a great idea, seeing that people who don’t actively work in this area (namely translators and interpreters themselves, as well as the agencies who hire their services) don’t usually know the difference among the several types of interpretation. This is the second post of a series, come back soon for the others!

So now that you know that translation is written and interpretation is oral, let’s move on to the types of interpretation I do: simultaneous, consecutive and whispered.

Simultaneous interpretation is better known as “simultaneous translation” (now you know that’s wrong!), and it’s personally my favorite type of interpretation.

It is recommended when most of the audience of an international speaker do not speak/ understand the speaker’s language well enough to fully understand the speaker’s message. It is more economically viable in large events, because it requires the use of specific equipment, usually rented, which can turn out to be too costly if just a few people are going to benefit from it.

The equipment used in simultaneous interpretation consists of at least one booth equipped with headsets (earphones + microphones), chairs and a small desk (more like a shelf, really), where there is an interpretation system with at least 2 channels (one for each language). Besides, the audience and the speakers themselves have to wear receivers (which operate using radio frequencies) and earphones in order to hear what the interpreters are saying. Each booth usually fits two interpreters and their equipment.

The air inside the booth is sometimes stuffy and hot, because even though the venue usually has air conditioning, the booth itself has to be insulated so that the interpreters’ voices don’t “leak” into the audience, which would annoy them.

The work of the simultaneous interpreter is to listen to the speaker, understand the message in a non-verbal way and reproduce it into the target-language, out loud and clearly enunciated, trying to preserve the speaker’s intention and intonation. All at the same time. So you can see why it is a fairly well-paid job: it demands a lot of concentration, deep knowledge of both languages, knowledge of the subject and even physical effort. That’s also why we tend to work in pairs, so that we can take turns to go to the restroom, to have a drink of water or just to take a breather.

Conferences usually take up most of the day, albeit with some short breaks for coffee and lunch, and at the end of the day the interpreters are usually a little tired, but accomplished. We usually act as a bridge between two groups (the speaker and the audience) who wish to share their knowledge and experience, and it’s quite a fulfilling experience to bring the two sides of this canyon closer together.

So now you know what simultaneous interpretation is all about. Any idea what consecutive interpretation means? Find out on the next post of the series!

==================================================================================================

Meu dedicado leitor João outro dia pediu que eu escrevesse algo sobre os diferentes tipos de interpretação que eu realizo. Essa foi mesmo uma ótima ideia, já que as pessoas que não trabalham ativamente nessa área (tradutores e intérpretes, assim como as agências que os contratam) normalmente não sabem a diferença entre os diversos tipos de interpretação. Este é o segundo post de uma série, volte em breve para ver os outros!

Agora que você já sabe que a tradução é escrita e a interpretação é oral, vamos passar para os tipos de interpretação que eu faço: simultânea, consecutiva e sussurrada.

A interpretação simultânea é mais conhecida como “tradução simultânea” (agora você sabe que esse termo é errado!), e pessoalmente é o meu tipo favorito de interpretação.

Ela é recomendada quando a maior parte do público de um palestrante internacional não fala/ entende seu idioma bem o suficiente para compreender completamente sua mensagem. Ela é mais economicamente viável em eventos de grande porte, porque requer o uso de um equipamento específico, normalmente alugado, que pode não compensar se apenas algumas pessoas forem se beneficiar dele.

O equipamento utilizado na interpretação simultânea consiste de pelo menos uma cabine equipada headsets (fones de ouvido + microfones), cadeiras e uma mesinha (na verdade, uma prateleira), onde fica o sistema de interpretação com pelo menos 2 canais (um para cada idioma). Além disso, o público e o próprio palestrante devem portar receptores (que operam utilizando freqüências de rádio) e fones de ouvido para poder ouvir os que os intérpretes dizem. Cada cabine comporta normalmente dois intérpretes e seus respectivos equipamentos.

O ar dentro da cabine às vezes fica abafado e quente, pois apesar de o local de evento normalmente contar com ar condicionado, a cabine em si tem que ser isolada, para que a voz dos intérpretes não “vaze” para o público o que seria irritante.

O trabalho do intérprete consecutivo é ouvir o palestrante, compreender sua mensagem, desverbalizá-la e reproduzi-la no idioma-alvo, em voz alta e com dicção clara, procurando manter a intenção e a entonação do palestrante. Tudo ao mesmo tempo. Então dá para entender porque é um trabalho relativamente bem remunerado: ele exige grande concentração, profundo conhecimentos dos dois idiomas, conhecimento do assunto e até mesmo um esforço físico. É por isso também que geralmente trabalhamos em duplas, para que possamos nos revezar para ir ao banheiro, beber água ou até mesmo fazer uma pausa.

Congressos normalmente duram o dia inteiro, mesmo que com pequenos intervalos para café e almoço, e no final do dia, os intérpretes em geral estão um pouco cansados, mas realizados. Freqüentemente servimos como uma ponte entre dois grupos (o palestrante e o público) que desejam compartilhar seus conhecimentos e experiência, e é muito gratificante ajudar a aproximar os dois lados desse abismo.

Então agora você já sabe tudo sobre interpretação simultânea. Alguma ideia do que significa interpretação consecutiva? Descubra no próximo post desta série!

3 Comments

Filed under about the blog, Translation and Interpretation

Translation and Interpretation #1

My devout reader João asked me the other day to write something about the different types of interpretation I do. That was actually a great idea, seeing that people who don’t actively work in this area (namely translators and interpreters themselves, as well as the agencies who hire their services) don’t usually know the difference among the several types of interpretation. This is the first post of a series, come back soon for the others!

First of all, let’s clarify the most common misconception in the area: translation x interpretation.

Translation is what we call the action of converting written materials from one language into another.

Interpretation is what we call the action of converting spoken language from one language into another.

This means that they are two different activities, and thus require different skills and techniques, although they have in common the fact that both must maintain the meaning of the original “text” while making it sound/ read as natural as possible in the target language. It also means that just because someone is a translator, that doesn’t automatically make them an interpreter. In fact, it’s much more common to find interpreters who are also translators than the other way around.

So if you need a text which was originally written in Portuguese to be converted into another language, call a translator. If you need your audience of Brazilians to understand what the American speaker is saying, call an interpreter.

But in that case, what kind of interpretation will you need?

Find out on the next post of this series!

==================================================================================================

Meu dedicado leitor João outro dia pediu que eu escrevesse algo sobre os diferentes tipos de interpretação que eu realizo. Essa foi mesmo uma ótima ideia, já que as pessoas que não trabalham ativamente nessa área (tradutores e intérpretes, assim como as agências que os contratam) normalmente não sabem a diferença entre os diversos tipos de interpretação. Este é o primeiro post de uma série, volte em breve para ver os outros!

Antes de tudo, vamos esclarecer a confusão mais comum nessa área: tradução x interpretação.

Tradução é o nome que damos à ação de passar materiais escritos de um idioma para outro.

Interpretação é o nome dado à ação de passar a linguagem falada de um idioma para outro.

Isso quer dizer que são duas atividades diferentes, e por isso exigem habilidades e técnicas diferentes, embora tenham em comum o fato de que ambas devem manter o sentido do “texto” original, e ao mesmo tempo fazer com que ele fique o mais natural possível no idioma de chegada. Também significa que só porque alguém é tradutor, essa pessoa não é automaticamente considerada um intérprete. Na verdade, é muito mais fácil encontrar intérpretes que também são tradutores do que vice-versa.

Então, se você precisa que um texto originalmente escrito em português seja passado para outra língua, chame um tradutor. Se você quer que seu público entenda o que o palestrante americano está dizendo, chame um intérprete.

Mas nesse caso, que tipo de interpretação você vai precisar?

Descubra no próximo post desta série!

4 Comments

Filed under about the blog, Translation and Interpretation